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Licensing 101: A Complete Guide to the Licensing of Clips on Videvo.net

in Category: Blog, Free stock footage News | by Videvo

Welcome to our guide on licensing and the usage of clips on Videvo.net. Below you will find all the information you need to ensure you are using clips from Videvo correctly, and not breaking any rules in the process. Firstly, it is important to point out that we license clips on Videvo in a number of different ways, and there are some clips on Videvo that you may not be able to use for certain types of project. Furthermore, you may have to credit the author of the clip. In this article we will cover the different types of license, usage, and how to credit the author if it is required.

 

Where can I find license and author information for a clip?

 

License, Usage and Author information for each clip is displayed on the clip download page in the top section to the right-hand side of the video player. Please see the image below for reference:

 

 

The Difference Between License and Usage

It is important to note that on Videvo we differentiate between license and usage. Broadly speaking, the license defines what permissions you have in terms of editing the clip, whether you need to provide a credit, where you can publish the clip so on. Usage dictates whether or not you may use the clip for commercial purposes to promote a product, brand, or service. If the usage states “All projects and media” you may use the clip for commercial purposes. If it states “Editorial Use Only”, you may not use the clip for commercial purposes. We will cover the topic of usage, both commercial and editorial in more detail later in this article.

 

Licenses:

Currently, there are 3 types of license on Videvo.net. Each video clip will be licensed in one of these ways. Music and Sound Effects are licensed as Royalty Free.

 


“Royalty Free License”:

 

This is our most common license and allows for unlimited use of the clip without paying future royalties, for perpetuity, and without crediting the original author in your work. You may not redistribute or share the clip in its original form i.e. make it available on another platform or service, for example, another stock footage website. Providing that you edit the clip in some way, such as adding music or including as part of a wider video project, you may publish the video anywhere you like. Below are the main features of the license:

 

  •     You may use the clip(s) for free and for perpetuity
  •     You are not required to credit the author of the clip(s)
  •     You may use and publish the clip(s) worldwide and on any platform, including web, broadcast, shows, theatre, apps, and games
  •     You may not redistribute the clip(s) in their original form (download and then re-upload the clip(s) elsewhere, e.g. torrent websites)

 


“Videvo Attribution License”:

 

This license allows for the use of the clip free of charge for perpetuity, but you must provide a credit to the original author of the clip. For more information about how to credit, scroll down this article to the section “How to provide a credit”. Similar to the Royalty Free License, you may not redistribute the clip(s) in their original form on other platforms or services, for example, torrent websites or other stock agencies.

 

  •     You may use the clip(s) for free and for perpetuity
  •     You must credit the author of the clip(s) in your production
  •     You may use and publish the clip(s) worldwide and on any platform, including web, broadcast, shows, theatre, apps, and games
  •     You may not redistribute the clip(s) in their original form (download and then re-upload the clip(s) elsewhere, e.g. torrent websites)

 


“Creative Commons 3.0 Unported (CC-BY)”:

 

This is similar to the Videvo Attribution License, but you are free to distribute the clip elsewhere in its original, unedited form. You must attribute the original author in all productions as well as any distribution channels in which the clip been made available for download. This license also allows for commercial use, although special attention should be paid to ensure that no identifiable persons, brands or private property appear in the clip(s) unless a model/property release has first been obtained.

 

  •     You may use the clip(s) for free and for perpetuity
  •     You must credit the author of the clip(s) in your production
  •     You may use and publish the clip(s) worldwide and on any platform, including web, broadcast, shows, theatre, apps, and games
  •     You may share, adapt, and redistribute the clip(s), but you may not sell the clip(s)

 

This is a rough overview of the CC 3.0 guidelines. For full information, read the CC 3.0 Guidelines here

 


“NASA License”:

Please refer to the guidelines for use of NASA imagery, located here

 

 


“Videvo Standard License”:

 

This is a legacy license that is no longer used for licensing content on Videvo. However, if you downloaded a clip in the past under this license then the same terms of that license still apply.

This License stipulates that:

  •   You may use the clip(s) for free and for perpetuity
  •   You are not required to credit the author of the clip(s)
  •   You may use and publish the clip(s) worldwide and on any platform, including web, broadcast, shows, theatre, apps, and games
  •   You may not redistribute the clip(s) in their original form (download and then re-upload the clip(s) elsewhere, e.g. torrent websites)

 


 

Usage: Commercial Use or Editorial Use Only

As we mentioned above, “Usage” defines whether a clip can be used for commercial purposes (all projects and media), or for editorial projects only (Editorial Use Only). On the clip download page, under “Usage” you will see one of two variations: “All projects and media” or “Editorial Use Only”. The screenshots below illustrate this:

 

Scenario 1: “All projects and media”. You may use the clip for commercial purposes.

 

Scenario 2: “Editorial Use Only”. You may not use the clip commercially.

 

 

Why do we make this distinction? Clips are normally marked as Editorial Use Only when they contain identifiable persons, private property that is the main focus of the shot, brands or logos that are the main focus of the shot, or artwork or copyrighted works. Without a release form from the person(s) appearing in the shot or the owner of the property, it is not possible to use the clip for commercial purposes. However, you may use the clip for editorial purposes.

 

What does “Editorial” mean and what projects are classed as Editorial?

 

Editorial content is defined as content that is newsworthy or documentary-worthy, that is providing a commentary on a story outside of a promotional context. For example, all news programming is considered editorial, because it is providing a commentary on real-world events as they happen. Documentaries are considered editorial, providing that the aim of the documentary is not to promote a brand product or service. Even if you are selling your documentary, it is still classed as editorial. Editorial images can also be used for educational purposes, providing the educational content is presented as a learning aid and is factual.

 

Here are some useful guides on the topic of editorial images/videos and intellectual property:

 

The Nimia Guide on Editorial Documentaries
https://nimia.com/documentary-vs-commercial-requirements-for-legal-releases

 

Shutterstock’s Guide to Editorial Images:
https://www.shutterstock.com/blog/2010/05/editorial-vs-commercial-images/

 

Getty’s Intellectual Property Wiki Page:
http://wiki.gettyimages.com/

 


 

How Do I Credit the Author?

As detailed above, many clips on Videvo require that you provide a credit to the author. If the clip(s) you have download requires that you attribute/credit the author, you can do so, either as an on-screen credit, or in any supporting documentation that is published alongside your finished video. For example, text on a webpage or in the description section for the video on YouTube. Please refer to the example scenario below:

 

Example on How to Credit:

In an example scenario, you have downloaded a clip created by the Author “Videvo” and it is licensed under the “Videvo Attribution License”. You edit this clip into your video, and you upload this video to YouTube to share with your subscribers.

 

On-Screen Credit:

In your video, you may include the text “Stock footage provided by Videvo, downloaded from www.videvo.net” – this on-screen credit can either appear over the video itself (see example below) or in the end credits. This text must be in a suitable font and large enough to be clearly readable, but it does not have to be so large as to distract from the main content.

 

A small text credit in the corner of the frame is sufficient in most instances.

 

Supporting Documentation Credit:

In the YouTube video description, you can include the text: “Stock footage provided by Videvo, downloaded from https://www.videvo.net”

 

 

Crediting the author for Creative Commons 3.0 Clips:

Creative Commons outline their own guidelines on how to credit the author of media licensed under CC 3.0 (CC-BY). You can read the guidelines here: https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/License_Versions#Detailed_attribution_comparison_chart

 


 

This marks the end of our guidelines on licensing and usage for clips on Videvo. If you have any questions regarding licensing, usage or how to credit you can contact us at hello@videvo.net, and we will do our best to help.
Last updated: 06th June 2018.